Question: What Is The Sutton Hoo Helmet?

What condition was the Sutton Hoo Helmet in?

When found, the magnificent helmet from the Anglo-Saxon grave at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, was in hundreds of pieces. The burial chamber had collapsed and reduced the helmet to a pile of fragments. Pieces of rusted iron were mixed up with pieces of tinned bronze, all so corroded as to be barely recognizable.

What is the Sutton Hoo helmet made of?

The helmet is the armoured head of a warrior, attended by gods. Made of hammered iron, proof against spear, sword and axe, it is also covered with protective metaphors. Across the face is a bird with splayed wings, its body forming the warrior’s nose, the tail his moustache and the wings his eyebrows.

What is Sutton Hoo and why is it important?

Sutton Hoo provides one of the richest sources of archaeological evidence for this period of the history of England’s development. The discovery in 1939 changed our understanding of the some of the first chapters of English history and a time seen as backwards was illuminated as cultured and sophisticated.

You might be interested:  Readers ask: What Zone Is Newham?

Who created the Sutton Hoo Helmet?

Sutton Hoo helmet
Material Iron, bronze, tin, gold, silver, garnets
Weight 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) (estimated)
Discovered 1939 Sutton Hoo, Suffolk52.089°N 1.338°ECoordinates:52.089°N 1.338°E
Discovered by Charles Phillips

Where is the Sutton Hoo ship now?

The Sutton Hoo artefacts are now housed in the collections of the British Museum, London, while the mound site is in the care of the National Trust. ‘We suspect that seafaring was rooted in the hearts of the Angles and Saxons that made England their home.

Who is buried at Sutton Hoo?

Sutton Hoo was in the kingdom of East Anglia and the coin dates suggest that it may be the burial of King Raedwald, who died around 625. The Sutton Hoo ship burial provides remarkable insights into early Anglo-Saxon England.

Where was the Sutton Hoo Helmet found?

This helmet was found at a burial site in Suffolk along with many other valuable objects. The burial provides insights into the life of the Anglo-Saxon elite and into connections between Britain and other parts of the world.

What was the most famous object found at Sutton Hoo?

In 1939, Edith Pretty, a landowner at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, asked archaeologist Basil Brown to investigate the largest of several Anglo-Saxon burial mounds on her property. Inside, he made one of the most spectacular archaeological discoveries of all time. Beneath the mound was the imprint of a 27m-long (86ft) ship.

Where is Sutton Hoo from?

Named after the nearby parish of Sutton, the place-name Sutton Hoo is likely derived from a combination of the Old English sut + tun, meaning south farmstead or village, and hoh, which describes a hill shaped like a heel spur.

You might be interested:  Often asked: Assassin's Creed Syndicate How To Get Into Lambeth Asylum?

What can be seen at Sutton Hoo?

Things to see and do

  • The Royal Burial Ground at Sutton Hoo. Explore the atmospheric seventh-century Royal Burial Ground as you discover the history and mystery of what lay beneath the earth.
  • Family and Learning Activities.
  • A ship returns.

Can you see the Sutton Hoo ship?

Can you see the original burial ship and helmet found at Sutton Hoo? Sadly no. The 27 metre long ship no longer exists. It disintegrated after being buried in acidic soil for over a thousand years.

Was there a body at Sutton Hoo?

The body was missing from the Sutton Hoo ship burial. During the 1939 excavation, no trace of human bones was found. Some archaeologists proposed that the tomb must have been a cenotaph—a memorial containing no body.

What happened Edith Pretty?

Edith Pretty died on 17 December 1942 in Richmond Hospital at the age of 59 after suffering a stroke, and was buried in All Saints churchyard at Sutton. In the late 20th century the house and Sutton Hoo burial site were bequeathed by the Tranmer family to the The National Trust, which now manages the site.

What is the connection between Sutton Hoo and Beowulf?

The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial In 1939, a seventh-century ship burial was excavated at Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge in Suffolk. Its significance to the study of Beowulf is the interesting mix of Christian and pagan practices involved in the burial that mirrors a similar mix in beliefs in the poem.

What was unusual about the Sutton Hoo spoons?

The Sutton Hoo ship burial contains the largest quantity of silver ever discovered in a grave. The spoons, with their apparent reference to the conversion of St Paul, have been described as a Christian element in this pagan burial.

Written by

Leave a Reply