Often asked: What Was The Sutton Hoo Helmet Used For?

What condition was the Sutton Hoo Helmet in?

When found, the magnificent helmet from the Anglo-Saxon grave at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, was in hundreds of pieces. The burial chamber had collapsed and reduced the helmet to a pile of fragments. Pieces of rusted iron were mixed up with pieces of tinned bronze, all so corroded as to be barely recognizable.

Who wore the Sutton Hoo Helmet?

I think it’s fair to say that the Sutton Hoo helmet is the face of the Anglo-Saxons, perhaps even all of the early middle ages in Europe. It is shown on numerous book covers, got its own commemorative stamp for the 250th anniversary of the British Museum and features in countless documentaries on the period.

Where was the Sutton Hoo Helmet found?

This helmet was found at a burial site in Suffolk along with many other valuable objects. The burial provides insights into the life of the Anglo-Saxon elite and into connections between Britain and other parts of the world.

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What is the purpose of Sutton Hoo?

The significance of Sutton Hoo Some 1400 years ago, a community came together to haul a ship from the river within which they buried their king along with treasured possessions for his final journey. It was a public spectacle intended to be remembered for all time.

Where is the Sutton Hoo ship now?

The Sutton Hoo artefacts are now housed in the collections of the British Museum, London, while the mound site is in the care of the National Trust. ‘We suspect that seafaring was rooted in the hearts of the Angles and Saxons that made England their home.

What can we learn from Sutton Hoo?

It reveals a place of exquisite craftsmanship and extensive international connections, spanning Europe and beyond. It also shows that the world of great halls, glittering treasures and formidable warriors described in Anglo-Saxon poetry was not a myth. Mrs Edith Pretty donated the finds to the British Museum in 1939.

Is the ship at Sutton Hoo still buried?

What, No Boat? The 27 metre long Anglo-Saxon ship from Sutton Hoo no longer exists.

Can you see the Sutton Hoo ship?

Can you see the original burial ship and helmet found at Sutton Hoo? Sadly no. The 27 metre long ship no longer exists. It disintegrated after being buried in acidic soil for over a thousand years.

How much of the Sutton Hoo Helmet is original?

It was buried around 625 and is widely believed to have belonged to King Rædwald of East Anglia; its elaborate decoration may have given it a secondary function akin to a crown.

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Sutton Hoo helmet
Discovered by Charles Phillips
Present location British Museum, London
Registration 1939,1010.93

Where does the name Sutton Hoo come from?

Named after the nearby parish of Sutton, the place- name Sutton Hoo is likely derived from a combination of the Old English sut + tun, meaning south farmstead or village, and hoh, which describes a hill shaped like a heel spur.

What is the connection between Sutton Hoo and Beowulf?

The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial In 1939, a seventh-century ship burial was excavated at Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge in Suffolk. Its significance to the study of Beowulf is the interesting mix of Christian and pagan practices involved in the burial that mirrors a similar mix in beliefs in the poem.

When was the Sutton Hoo dig?

The discovery of the Great Ship Burial in 1939 not only stunned the archaeology world, but it set the scene for further exploration. Later archaeological campaigns have solved mysteries left by the original dig and revealed more about life in this Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

What is the Sutton Hoo treasure?

In 1939 a series of mounds at Sutton Hoo in England revealed their astounding contents: the remains of an Anglo-Saxon funerary ship and a huge cache of seventh-century royal treasure. In southern England near the Suffolk coast lies a stretch of sandy heathland dotted by mysterious mounds of earth.

Was there a body at Sutton Hoo?

The body was missing from the Sutton Hoo ship burial. During the 1939 excavation, no trace of human bones was found. Some archaeologists proposed that the tomb must have been a cenotaph—a memorial containing no body.

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