Often asked: Sutton Hoo What Was Found?

What was found at Sutton Hoo site?

The ghostly treasure ship of Sutton Hoo. In 1939 a series of mounds at Sutton Hoo in England revealed their astounding contents: the remains of an Anglo-Saxon funerary ship and a huge cache of seventh-century royal treasure.

What was found at Sutton Hoo and what was its importance?

Sutton Hoo provides one of the richest sources of archaeological evidence for this period of the history of England’s development. The discovery in 1939 changed our understanding of the some of the first chapters of English history and a time seen as backwards was illuminated as cultured and sophisticated.

What was excavated at Sutton Hoo?

It was in the summer of 1939, just ahead of the British declaration of war on 3 September, that he, together with William Spooner and John Jacobs, found iron rivets from the hull of a ship, one of only three Anglo-Saxon ship burials discovered in England.

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Where is Sutton Hoo and what was found there?

Sutton Hoo is England’s Valley of the Kings, and the Anglo-Saxon ship burial found in the King’s Mound is the richest burial ever found in northern Europe. 1,400 years ago, a king or great warrior of East Anglia was laid to rest in a 90ft ship, surrounded by his extraordinary treasures.

Where is the Sutton Hoo ship now?

The Sutton Hoo artefacts are now housed in the collections of the British Museum, London, while the mound site is in the care of the National Trust. ‘We suspect that seafaring was rooted in the hearts of the Angles and Saxons that made England their home.

Who is buried at Sutton Hoo?

Sutton Hoo was in the kingdom of East Anglia and the coin dates suggest that it may be the burial of King Raedwald, who died around 625. The Sutton Hoo ship burial provides remarkable insights into early Anglo-Saxon England.

What is the history of Sutton Hoo?

Sutton Hoo is the site of two early medieval cemeteries dating from the 6th to 7th centuries near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England. Archaeologists have been excavating the area since 1938. One cemetery had an undisturbed ship burial with a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artefacts.

What happened to Mrs Pretty?

Death and subsequent ownership Edith Pretty died on 17 December 1942 in Richmond Hospital at the age of 59 after suffering a stroke, and was buried in All Saints churchyard at Sutton.

Who used the Sutton Hoo Helmet?

The Sutton Hoo helmet is an ornately decorated Anglo-Saxon helmet found during a 1939 excavation of the Sutton Hoo ship-burial. It was buried around 625 and is widely believed to have belonged to King Rædwald of East Anglia; its elaborate decoration may have given it a secondary function akin to a crown.

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Did they find bones at Sutton Hoo?

The body was missing from the Sutton Hoo ship burial. During the 1939 excavation, no trace of human bones was found.

Can you see the Sutton Hoo ship?

Can you see the original burial ship and helmet found at Sutton Hoo? Sadly no. The 27 metre long ship no longer exists. It disintegrated after being buried in acidic soil for over a thousand years.

What is Sutton Hoo famous for?

Sutton Hoo is the site of the grave of an Anglo-Saxon king in Suffolk, England. Discovered in 1939, it is one of the largest and best-preserved archaeological finds of the Saxon period in Europe.

What does hoo mean in Sutton Hoo?

Named after the nearby parish of Sutton, the place-name Sutton Hoo is likely derived from a combination of the Old English sut + tun, meaning south farmstead or village, and hoh, which describes a hill shaped like a heel spur.

Where was the Sutton Hoo Helmet found?

This helmet was found at a burial site in Suffolk along with many other valuable objects. The burial provides insights into the life of the Anglo-Saxon elite and into connections between Britain and other parts of the world.

How does Sutton Hoo relate to Beowulf?

Sutton Hoo is an Anglo-Saxon ship burial (also described by some as a grave field) that is located in England in the county of Suffolk. The poem Beowulf describes how Scyld, King of the Danes, is buried.

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