FAQ: How Old Is Sutton Hoo?

What does hoo mean in Sutton Hoo?

Named after the nearby parish of Sutton, the place-name Sutton Hoo is likely derived from a combination of the Old English sut + tun, meaning south farmstead or village, and hoh, which describes a hill shaped like a heel spur.

Who was buried in Sutton Hoo?

Sutton Hoo was in the kingdom of East Anglia and the coin dates suggest that it may be the burial of King Raedwald, who died around 625. The Sutton Hoo ship burial provides remarkable insights into early Anglo-Saxon England.

Who found Sutton Hoo?

In 1939, Edith Pretty, a landowner at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, asked archaeologist Basil Brown to investigate the largest of several Anglo-Saxon burial mounds on her property. Inside, he made one of the most spectacular archaeological discoveries of all time. Beneath the mound was the imprint of a 27m-long (86ft) ship.

How many helmets were found at Sutton Hoo?

It was buried around 625 and is widely believed to have belonged to King Rædwald of East Anglia; its elaborate decoration may have given it a secondary function akin to a crown.

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Sutton Hoo helmet
Discovered by Charles Phillips
Present location British Museum, London
Registration 1939,1010.93

Where is the Sutton Hoo ship now?

The Sutton Hoo artefacts are now housed in the collections of the British Museum, London, while the mound site is in the care of the National Trust. ‘We suspect that seafaring was rooted in the hearts of the Angles and Saxons that made England their home.

What happened to Sutton Hoo?

The 27 metre long Anglo-Saxon ship from Sutton Hoo no longer exists. It was made of oak and after 1,300 years in the acidic soil, it rotted away leaving only its ‘ghost’ imprinted in the sand.

Can you see the Sutton Hoo ship?

Can you see the original burial ship and helmet found at Sutton Hoo? Sadly no. The 27 metre long ship no longer exists. It disintegrated after being buried in acidic soil for over a thousand years.

Why is Sutton Hoo so important?

Sutton Hoo provides one of the richest sources of archaeological evidence for this period of the history of England’s development. The discovery in 1939 changed our understanding of the some of the first chapters of English history and a time seen as backwards was illuminated as cultured and sophisticated.

What happened to Mrs Pretty?

Death and subsequent ownership Edith Pretty died on 17 December 1942 in Richmond Hospital at the age of 59 after suffering a stroke, and was buried in All Saints churchyard at Sutton.

Did Henry VIII dig at Sutton Hoo?

All digs revealed evidence of earlier gave diggers and robbers. Henry VIII’s agents and John Dee, Elizabeth I’s court sorcerer, dug for treasure at Sutton Hoo – and there is evidence to suggest that the former were quite successful.

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Has Sutton Hoo been excavated?

There were two ship burials at Sutton Hoo – the great ship burial excavated in 1939, and the smaller one in mound 2, excavated in 1938 and here being re – excavated in 1985. The mound has now been reconstructed and forms the most prominent feature on the site.

What can be seen at Sutton Hoo?

Things to see and do

  • The Royal Burial Ground at Sutton Hoo. Explore the atmospheric seventh-century Royal Burial Ground as you discover the history and mystery of what lay beneath the earth.
  • Family and Learning Activities.
  • A ship returns.

Why is it called the Sutton Hoo treasure?

Sutton Hoo derives its name from Old English. Sut combined with tun means the “southern farmstead” or “settlement” and hoh refers to a hill “shaped like a heel spur”.

Did a plane crash near Sutton Hoo?

Although no planes ever crashed at Sutton Hoo, late in the Second World War a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber, Little Davy II, plummeted into the River Deben not far from the site. Only two survived.

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